Creating custom wireless headphones

One part AIAIAI, one part Sennheiser and another part Nils

I built my own custom Frankenstein headphones from my AIAIAI TMA-2 Wireless and my trusty Sennheiser HD25’s. Here’s why and how.

AIAIAI Sennheiser Wireless Frankenstein Headphones - Clear cups
AIAIAI Sennheiser Wireless Frankenstein Headphones - Clear cups

As a music enthusiast I was unsatisfied with the sound signature of current wireless offerings by Sony, Bose and the likes. And while the preset AIAIAI headphones look great, I had trouble getting used to its sound signature as well. Being a designer, I decided it was time to merge my trusty Sennheiser HD 25’s with the AIAIAI wireless headband. I designed the cups that would enclose the drivers of my HD25’s, soldered new female 3.5mm jacks to the contraption and hooked them up. There it was, sound!

Wearing my custom headphones
Wearing my custom headphones

After several tries – 3D printing something that fits snugly usually takes a few – the first version of a wireless headphone was born. While printed in PLA, and with a consumer grade FDM printer (Prusa i3+), it provided to be a good enough overall experience for about a year. After that the material started cracking and showing its wear. As our new Prusa SL1 had just arrived, we now had the possibility to print with resin, which enabled a see-through design and decreased the likeliness of cracking at the same time.

After slight modifications to the ratchet system, I was able to print the resin cups. The resin turned out to not be as clear as expected, and needed a little help of a clear coat and some polish (JIF/CIF works great for this) to become truly see-through, but the end result is absolutely what I’d hoped for.

If you’d like to replicate this project, you can download the 3D models for free.